[ HomeWhat's New!In Progress ] [ Family Tree ] [ Stories ] [ EmailComments ] [ FacebookTwitterGoogle+ ]
[ MythologyDiné ClansHogansArts & CraftsInfrastructureLandforms ]
[ Code TalkersNCT Coder ] [ Diné BizaadTimelineLawsLong WalkLeadersMap ]
[ FAQDiné CollegeNavajo TechChapter HousesDirectoryMiss NavajoMiss Northern NavajoResources ]
[ Navajo TimesNavajo Hopi ObserverNavajo PostFarmington Daily TimesKTNNKOBFTV ]
[ Navajo CentralKayenta TownshipNavajo NationDiscover NavajoWikipedia Navajo ]


 
---- Friday - December 2, 2016 - 3:17:30 PM - Navajo Nation Time ----

Mount Taylor
(Original Ceremonial Name: Tsoodzil - meaning is obscure)
(Sacred Name: Dootl’izhiidziil - Turquoise Mountain)

Mount Taylor is the "Turquoise Mountain" and "Sacred Mountain of the South" to the Navajos. It is a high mountain peak with an elevation of 11,389 feet, located on the southwestern part of the San Mateo Mountains, midway between Albuquerque and Gallup, New Mexico, and about 15 miles northeast of Grants, New Mexico from interstate highway 40.

Mount Taylor was originally called "San Mateo", to be renamed after General Zachary Taylor of Mexican War fame (and later 12th President of the United States of America). It is visible from points in the Navajo country as far as Chuska Peak, 100 miles west. Projecting to the south and north-east are large lava flows which sheer off from their forested tops in irregular and ragged escarpments. The peaks retain their snows until late in the spring.

Mt. Taylor has a couple of Navajo mythology and ceremonies associated with it. Navajos refer to Mount Taylor as their "Sacred Mountain of the South", and to indicate their legal southern boundary of their old country. Mt. Taylor, is in Navajo legend, the "Turquoise Mountain" fastened from the sky to the earth with a great flint knife and decorated with turquoise, dark mist, female rain and all species of animals and birds. Here is the home of Dootl’izhii ‘Ashkii (Turquoise Boy), Naadá’áltsoii ‘Át’ééd (Yellow Corn Girl), and Hashch’éghaan (meaning unknown). It is also important in the Blessing Side ceremonies and the ‘Anaa’jí (Enemy Side) Ceremony. Mount Taylor was once the home of Yé’iitsoh (Chief of the Enemy Gods). Mt. Taylor does not have the sacred significance of the other sacred mountains of the cardinal directions: San Francisco Peaks (Dook’o’oslííd), Mt. Hesperus (Dibé Ntsaa) of the La Plata Mountains, and Sierra Blanca Peak (Tsisnaasjini').

[ HomeWhat's New!In Progress ] [ Family Tree ] [ Stories ] [ EmailComments ] [ FacebookTwitterGoogle+ ]
[ MythologyDiné ClansHogansArts & CraftsInfrastructureLandforms ]
[ Code TalkersNCT Coder ] [ Diné BizaadTimelineLawsLong WalkLeadersMap ]
[ FAQDiné CollegeNavajo TechChapter HousesDirectoryMiss NavajoMiss Northern NavajoResources ]
[ Navajo TimesNavajo Hopi ObserverNavajo PostFarmington Daily TimesKTNNKOBFTV ]
[ Navajo CentralKayenta TownshipNavajo NationDiscover NavajoWikipedia Navajo ]

You are visitor 54,420 to Mount_Taylor.cfm since 08/27/01
and visitor 16,262,185 to LAPAHIE.com since 06/15/97

URL: http://www.lapahie.com /Mount_Taylor.cfm
Creator(s): Harrison Lapahie Jr.
Dated Created: 08/27/2001
Version: 2.0
Updated: 12/12/2004
Curator(s): Harrison Lapahie Jr.
Questions/Comments: Harrison Lapahie Jr.

Mount_Taylor.cfm: Copyright © 2001 - Harrison Lapahie Jr. - All Rights Reserved.