[ HomeWhat's New!In Progress ] [ Family Tree ] [ Stories ] [ EmailComments ] [ FacebookTwitterGoogle+ ]
[ MythologyDiné ClansHogansArts & CraftsInfrastructureLandforms ]
[ Code TalkersNCT Coder ] [ Diné BizaadTimelineLawsLong WalkLeadersMap ]
[ FAQDiné CollegeNavajo TechChapter HousesDirectoryMiss NavajoMiss Northern NavajoResources ]
[ Navajo TimesNavajo Hopi ObserverNavajo PostFarmington Daily TimesKTNNKOBFTV ]
[ Navajo CentralKayenta TownshipNavajo NationDiscover NavajoWikipedia Navajo ]


 
---- Wednesday - December 13, 2017 - 5:57:06 AM - Navajo Nation Time ----

El Morro
(Tsk'i Na'asdzoo - Is Marked on the Rock)

El Morro, also known as Inscription Rock, is located within El Morro National Monument, 15 miles north-east of Ramah, New Mexico, and 43 miles south of Grants. As the name El Morro indicates, the great buff promontory, rises 200 feet above the lava strewn valley sweeping north-east to the pine-clad Zui Mountains, resembling a huge fortress or castle. In addition to the world famous inscriptions, there are 2 major 'Anasz ruins and a number of smaller ones located on the crown of the rock.

Spanish explorers named the rock El Morro and left over 50 inscriptions, the earliest dating from 1605 (or 1606). Hundreds of other inscriptions commemorate visits of missionaries, soldiers, emigrants, traders and travelers. El Morro was a strategic point on the old Zui - Acoma Trail. The cove on the east side afforded shelter for a whole company, and the deep pool was always full of fresh water.

The earliest inscription so far discovered is that of Don Juan de Oate, Governor and colonizer of the Province of New Mexico and founder of the city of Santa Fe. In 1606, on his return journey from the Gulf of California to New Mexico, he passed El Morro and left a record of his visit cut into the sandstone walls. Governor Manuel de Silva Nieto, who succeeded Oate and conveyed the 1st Franciscan missionaries to Hawikuh, left an inscription dated July 29, 1629, which reads in part:

"I am Captain-General of the provinces of New Mexico for the King, our Lord. Passed here on the return from the towns of Zui on the 29th day of July of the year 1629,and he put them in peace upon their petition, asking him his favor as vassals of his majesty, and anew they gave their obedience, all of which he did with clemency, zeal, and providence, (and) as such (a) most Christian most extraordinary and gallant soldier of unending and praised memory."

Lieutenant, later General, J.H. Simpson and the artist, R.H. Kern, though not the 1st Americans to see the rock, visited the place in 1849, and Simpson's report contains a lengthy description of the rock, together with Kern's invaluable sketches.

In addition to the inscriptions in Spanish and English, there are many Indian glyphs carved on the walls. Above the inscriptions and reached by a foot trail are 2 large 'Anasz pueblos built about A.D. 1400.

Inscription Rock and 240 acres of land were set aside as the El Morro National Monument by presidential proclamation in 1906.

[ HomeWhat's New!In Progress ] [ Family Tree ] [ Stories ] [ EmailComments ] [ FacebookTwitterGoogle+ ]
[ MythologyDiné ClansHogansArts & CraftsInfrastructureLandforms ]
[ Code TalkersNCT Coder ] [ Diné BizaadTimelineLawsLong WalkLeadersMap ]
[ FAQDiné CollegeNavajo TechChapter HousesDirectoryMiss NavajoMiss Northern NavajoResources ]
[ Navajo TimesNavajo Hopi ObserverNavajo PostFarmington Daily TimesKTNNKOBFTV ]
[ Navajo CentralKayenta TownshipNavajo NationDiscover NavajoWikipedia Navajo ]

You are visitor 16,606 to El_Morro_Mesa.cfm since 08/27/01
and visitor 17,028,400 to LAPAHIE.com since 06/15/97

URL: http://www.lapahie.com /El_Morro_Mesa.cfm
Creator(s): Harrison Lapahie Jr.
Dated Created: 08/27/2001
Version: 2.0
Updated: 08/20/2004
Curator(s): Harrison Lapahie Jr.
Resource(s): Harrison Lapahie Jr.
Questions/Comments: Harrison Lapahie Jr.

El_Morro_Mesa.cfm: Copyright © 2001 - Harrison Lapahie Jr. - All Rights Reserved.