LAPAHIE.com 6.5  \  Scenic Pictures on the Navajo Nation in New Mexico
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---- Monday - December 18, 2017 - 11:28:50 AM - Navajo Nation Time ----

New Mexico


Shiprock Peak (Tsé Bit'Ai - "Rock with Wings"), is an extinct volcano that lies in the four corners area of New Mexico. A mythical legend says that the Navajos, escaping from their enemies, climbed on Tsé Bit'Ai, when Tsé Bit'Ai flew them and landed them at its present location. Anglos-Americans seeing Tsé Bit'Ai saw a landform that reminded them of a 19th century American Clipper Ship in full sail, giving it the name "Shiprock". The town of Shiprock (Dibé Bitó Litsooí or Naat'áanii Nééz) named after the Shiprock Pinnacle is about 35 miles north-east of it and can be seen from El Huerfano (Dzil Ná'oodilii), a sacred mountain, about 100 miles east of Tsé Bit'Ai.


Sheep corral just east of Shiprock Peak, Tsé Bit'Ai.


Dondo (Harrison Lapahie Jr.), Lillie Todychini, mom of Dondo, and Julia Armstrong, grandma of Dondo, on New Mexico State Highway 666, the road between Table Mesa and Shiprock (Naat'áanii Nééz), going to Naat'áanii Nééz. Photo was taken during the summer of 1969.


Shiprock Peak (Tsé Bit'Ai) as seen from Shiprock Hospital, in Shiprock (Naat'áanii Nééz), New Mexico.


A picture that dad, Harrison Lapahie, had in his silversmith shop in the back of the Lapahie apartment in Los Angeles. From 1974 to 1979, dad (and sometimes mom, Lille Lapahie) would use some of their free time making Navajo bracelets, rings, and bolo ties. The painting was done by a friend of dad's, Edward Carl, a Navajo youngster who attended Shiprock Boarding School in the 1920's and 30's. He died of tuberculosis in the 30's while just turning a teenager. The reason this picture was added was because of the rememberance of dad in his silver smith shop, playing the cassettes and vinyl records of old Navajo songs while singing along with them.


A Stamp of Shiprock Peak, Tsé Bit'Ai, issued in 1962 for commemoration of 50 years of New Mexico Statehood (1912 to 1962).


A petroglyph of an old style type of Navajo "Ye'i" (God). This Ye'i represents the "God of Harvest, God of Plenty, and God of Mist". This Ye'i holds a staff, or digging stick, and wears mountain sheep horns and a feathered hump that contains seeds and moisture. This Ye'i is important today in the Night Chant ceremony. This petroglyph panel carved on a sandstone cliff is at Crow Canyon, New Mexico.


Table Mesa, New Mexico, just about 15 miles south of the Shiprock pinnacle (Tsé Bit'Ai), is the region where Harrison Lapahie Jr's grandfather, Willie Lapahie, had his summer camp to herd his sheep and goats.


Rim view of D shaped or semi-circular 1000 year old Pueblo Bonito, in Chaco Canyon National Monument, New Mexico. Pueblo Bonito was the center of the great Anasazi culture of ancient times, were a network of foot roads connected between Chaco Canyon and the other Anasazi and Pueblo hamlets of the New World. There was also a connection between Chaco Canyon and the great Indians cultures of Mexico. The Anasazi ("Ancient Ones" in Navajo) were the first apartment inhabitants in the New World. Chaco Canyon is about 60 miles south-west of El Huerfano (Dzil Ná'oodilii) requiring one to travel on a dusty dirt road to get there.


Kiva and walls of Chettro Kettle, in Chaco Canyon National Monument, New Mexico.


Shown is the "Sun Dagger" by which the Chacoans (Anasazi) were able to read the harvesting and planting seasons and recorded time's passage. At the winter solstice, rays of sunlight fell between the 2 huge stone slabs, neatly bracketing the spiral petroglyph on 443 foot Fajada Butte at the south entrance to Chaco Canyon. At the summer soltice, a single band of light bisects the center of the spiral. The spring and fall equinoxes were heralded by an additional light that fell on the smaller petroglyph, visible to the left of the larger one. This discover was made by Anna Sofaer in 1977.


El Morro Mesa, in the Ramah Navajo Chapter area, is separated from the main Navajo reservation and just south of it in New Mexico. It is the site of the ruins of the Atsinna pueblo.


Ramon Garcia Jurado's 1709 Inscription at El Morro National Monument, at El Morro Mesa.


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