LAPAHIE.com 6.5  \  Scenic Pictures on the Navajo Nation in Arizona
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---- Sunday - December 17, 2017 - 4:13:26 PM - Navajo Nation Time ----

Arizona


The sacred site, Window Rock, during the winter, just 50 yards north of the Navajo Nation Headquarters building, in the town of Window Rock. Window Rock is the Capitol of the Navajo Nation.


A close-up view of the hole in Window Rock.


The Baby Rocks Mesa, 4 miles east of Church Rock, Arizona, and about 15 east of Kayenta alongside U.S. highway 160.


This picture show how huge Baby Rocks Mesa actually is. Nilda Lapahie and the Jeep Grand Cherokee are diminutive against it.


About 10 miles east of Kayenta, Church Rock (on the left) and Agathla Peak (in the far distance) can be seen to the north, from U.S. highway 160.


Church Rock, Arizona, looks somewhat like a mountain Cathedral, and is an inspiring view.


Agathla Peak (El Capitan), Arizona, as seen from Church Rock, Arizona.


El Capitan (Agathla Peak), Arizona, is just north of Kayenta, and is over 6,099 feet high. It is the gateway to Monument Valley.


Highway 163 heading toward Monument Valley on the Navajo Nation. In Navajo, Monument Valley is called "Tsé Bii' Ndzisgaii", meaning "Valley of the Rocks".


Picturesque view of Monument Valley.


Monument Valley, Arizona, during the winter, showing from left to right, West Mitten Butte, East Mitten Butte, and Merrick Butte.


A closer view of West Mitten Butte at Monument Valley, Arizona.


A horse posing for a picture in Monument Valley, Arizona.


Yei-Bi-Chei Rocks in Monument Valley, Arizona. The column sandstones represent Navajo men dancing in line while performing the Yeibichei ceremony on the 9th night for a physically sick person. The Yeibichei is a Navajo ceremony performed in the winter to treat a person afflicted with eye trouble, ear trouble, or paralysis on some part of the body. The term "Yeibichei", is derived from the principal diety involved, "Hastse yalte" (Talking God), who is also called "Yeibichei" (Grandfather God). During the 9 days and nights of the ceremony, most of the patient's treatment takes place inside the hogan. It is only on the 9th night that the "Yeis" (the Gods), come and dance outside the hogan in public view. Yeibichei, Grandfather God, is present, hence it is called the Yeibichei dance.


Train Rock in Mountain Valley, Arizona.


A wider view of Yei-Bi-Chei Rocks during the winter in Monument Valley, Arizona.


An aerial view of Monument Valley, Arizona, showing why it is called in Navajo, "Tsé Bii' Ndzisgaii" (Valley of the Rocks).


Canyon De Chelly National Park, Arizona, showing the quick sand like ground between the canyons. In the bottom center you can make out a hogan with a sheep corral.


White House Ruins in Canyon de Chelly National Park in Arizona. The name White House Ruins came from what the Navajos in the area had called it, "Kinii'Na'igai", Navajo for "White House In Between".


A closer view of the White House Ruins. Steep walled overhanging canyons sheltered prehistoric "Anasazi" (Navajo for "Ancient Ones") Indians for about 1000 years. Perched on high ledges, these dwellings were built in multilevels.


The window looking into Canyon De Chelly National Park, Arizona.


Spider Rock, rising out of the mouth of Monument Canyon in Canyon De Chelly, is the dwelling place of Spider Grandmother, who weaves a web of rainbows from its pinnacle to the canyon walls around it. It is about 800 feet tall.


A rainbow ending at Spider Rock!


This "Star Ceiling" petroglyph was found in a rock-shelter in Canyon de Chelly by Navajo teacher Harry Walters. Each star is made up of a 4 pointed cross as the Navajos had drawn them. Some might represent Navajo constellation, but most seem randomly placed. So far, about 5 dozen "Star Ceilings" have been found. The pictograph in Navajo mythology represents symbols that keep the rock ceiling from falling and therefore to protect the people and dwellings below, as the stars hold up the sky to protect the people below. According to Navajo mythology, First Woman ('Altsé 'Asdzáá) and First Man ('Altsé Hastiin) had all the stars laid out on a blanket and were setting each star in place when the trickster Coyote came along. Coyote wanted to help, but the work of placing and naming the stars was too slow for him. So he grabbed a corner of the blanket and flipped the remaining stars into the sky. This is why the sky, and perhaps the ceiling too, are filled with such a confusing array of stars.


This rock painting in Canyon De Chelly dates from the early 1800's shows the arrival of the Spaniards on horseback. The Navajos acquired the horses, sheeps, goats, and cattle during the arrival of the Spaniards and Friars in the 1500's by raiding and plundering them.


Coal Mine Canyon is on the western boundary and was in the joint use area of the Hopi and Navajo Nation in Arizona. Recently because of court decision, Coal Mine Canyon now is part of the Hopi Nation even though many Navajos reside there.


A closer view of Coal Mine Canyon.


Black Mesa, near the town of Rough Rock, Arizona, represents the female mountain, and the trunk of Earth Woman's body according to traditional Navajo beliefs.

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